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It is Friday and guess what, it is sunny in New York City with an expected high temperature of 88 degrees! Yes, even the weather is cooperating and that means people will be heading out with friends or just chillin and enjoying the weather listening to some excellent Soca music. Right there I got the idea for this post... to deliver a post that features some sweet Soca vibes. 

What should I post? A mixtape of some of the most popular Soca songs, an old school Soca mix, chart toppers or just the music of a selected artist... what should I do? I decided to pick a mixtape that featured a main artist/singer with featured singers/producers on his or her songs. I found a really enjoyable one... Patrice Roberts with some of your favorite singers. The mix is by ScottchBonnet with songs by Patrice Roberts featuring Lyrikal, Afro B, Nessa Preppy, Travis World. 
 
ScottchBonnet is a son of the soil, born in Trinidad, and with his exceptional skills, distinct style, and unwavering passion, he has carved a niche for himself as a DJ and producer, captivating audiences and leaving an indelible mark on music. He is as hot as the Scotch Bonnet pepper, but he turns up the heat with his unique music mixing skills. There is no doubt that this is an excellent mix to listen to as you enjoy the beautiful weather and then get ready for the party that follows. The mix is just over forty minutes long... enjoy Patrice Roberts and friends. 
 
Visit our official website for the latest posts: Sokah2Soca
 
Let us promote the culture of the Caribbean diaspora:
Our goal is to promote Caribbean culture, artists and music producers. Become the proverbial culture vulture and share this post with your peers and on all social media platforms. We are on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagram and Soundcloud. All our posts are available on FeedSpot, and via Email Subscription. Thank you in advance.
 
Production Notes/Music Credits:
Mixtape: Best of Patrice Roberts feat.Lyrikal, Afro B, Nessa Preppy, Travis World. 
Mixed by: ScottchBonnet
Genre: Soca 
 
Please be advised that the music is presented here for your listening pleasure and for promotional purposes only ("Fair Use" Musical Content Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976). No copyright infringement is intended! We don't own the rights to this music: and, it is presented here for promotional use only. We encourage you to promote the artists and their music; please don't download and share the music and rob the artists of needed income! Music for sale should be purchased while music distributed for promotion purposes should be treated as such and not shared!
♫Please press the music player button below to listen now (small triangle in the Music player/TV Frame).

In terms of West Indian styled carnivals Trinidad and Tobago's festival is one of the best known Caribbean carnivals in the world. Carnival 2023 was a sell out with many revelers disappointed that they could not get a costume to play mas with some of the more popular bands masquerading on the streets of the capital city. In fact, Trinidad and Tobago's carnival is one of several vibrant and exuberant festivals that showcase the rich cultural heritage of the Caribbean. However, for this post, I want to talk about online images. Everyone involved in the festival loves the masquerade bands where participants don elaborate costumes and parade through the streets in a celebration of music, dance, and self-expression. Think about it for a moment. The music is dominated by black artists (the music that drives the carnival), the Steelband players are all local talent with a few players from foreign countries but the masqueraders in the bands, mostly female, are light skin colored. Why is that the case?

Now, I am not trying to make myself crazy here. However, let's face it Carnival though originally a European import was shaped into what it is today by mostly people of African ancestry. Granted that Trinidad is a very cosmopolitan society boasting people of African heritage, European whites, Syrians, Lebanese, Chinese, Pyols from Venezuela and East Indians the disparity when one watches the main masquerade bands is striking! We have to face the fact that Carnival still flows from our African heritage. The music including Calypso and Soca, the cultural events are all African with the exception of the "Chutney elements" from the East Indian community. This historical diversity continues to influence the country's demographics and cultural expressions, including Trinidad's Carnival.

It is true that the diversity of culture in our society makes our festival what it is today... that's true! Before the main parade days, we go out and experience everything. Indeed, there is diversity in the fetes. People of all colors and status attend fetes and have fun together. It is imperative to recognize that Carnival is not solely about race or skin color. Instead, it is about embracing Trinidad and Tobago's cultural diversity and vibrancy.

I am most likely to get in trouble for what is said in this paragraph. However, this is how I feel about what we see online. Unfortunately, many cultures worldwide have historically perpetuated beauty standards that favor lighter skin tones, associating them with notions of privilege, attractiveness, and social status. These deeply ingrained biases are a consequence of colonialism, where Eurocentric ideals were imposed on communities, creating a hierarchy based on skin color. In Trinidad we are sinners when it comes to thinking that 'red women', a term used in the Caribbean to reference lighter skinned women, are better than dark skinned women. If you don't believe me just ask any Trinidadian woman how the Trinidadian male reacted to the Venezuelan women entering the country. C'est la vie!

Color of our skin may not be the main issue here. Perhaps it is just a question of finance. Less is more and the skimpier the costumes, the more enticing and costly they are. Is it true that most of the women in those high-priced bands are financially better able to pay US $1,200 for those costumes? Perhaps the dark-skinned women don't think it is a wise decision to spend that much money playing games. Maybe the freedom to just hang out and have a good time means more to them than spending money just saying I was in 'that band'. Wait, maybe some women of color won't dress to that extent to have a good time. What is your opinion?

In society, colorism concepts need to be addressed. Maybe there could be workshops to deal with this issue. In the end, from what we see online, not much has changed. Just recently, the Barbados Crop Over carnival bands launched. The models on stage were mostly light-skinned. Now while Trinidad's Carnival is a celebration of cultural diversity, artistic expression, and inclusivity, we need to become inclusive of all colors. Just maybe the people playing "pretty mas or skimpy mas" may truly reflect the women in the society. 

Visit our website for the latest posts: Sokah2Soca

Let us promote the culture of the Caribbean diaspora:
Our goal is to promote Caribbean culture, artists and music producers. Become the proverbial culture vulture and share this post with your peers and on all social media platforms. We are on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagram and Soundcloud. All our posts are available on FeedSpot, and via Email Subscription. Thank you in advance.

 

"Dat Shot" is the latest music release by Problem Child produced by Lashley "Motto" Winter of Saint Lucia. The song, from the Domino Album aka Riddim, was released in time for both Saint Lucia and Saint Vincent Carnivals 2023. The music composed by Motto on this very catchy rhythm (riddim) and engaging lyrical content makes this one ear candy for Carnival revelers.

It is possible that "Dat Shot" refers to "Back Shot" in this song, and that may be the case for this song. These lyrics are typical of Soca songs today. It has its place and audience. This is the type of song that carnival party attendees latch on to because of the catchy lyrics and the substance of the song. Problem Child is a skillful songwriter who plays with words and evokes carnival spirit in his songs. This song will be very popular for summer carnivals.

"Dat Shot" and the Domino Riddim songs are just one week old. Problem Child's song has already been at the forefront of YouTube music searches. Finally, because of the infectious rhythms, engaging lyrics and cultural significance, we expect this one to become a party favorite.

As "Dat Shot" continues to capture audiences, it will undoubtedly leave an indelible mark on the contemporary music landscape. It will stand as a testament to the enduring power of Soca and Caribbean music as a whole. Enjoy!

Visit our website for the latest posts: Sokah2Soca

Let us promote the culture of the Caribbean diaspora:
Our goal is to promote Caribbean culture, artists and music producers. Become the proverbial culture vulture and share this post with your peers and on all social media platforms. We are on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagram and Soundcloud. All our posts are available on FeedSpot, and via Email Subscription. Thank you in advance.
 
Production Notes/Music Credits:
Song Title: Dat Shot 
Artist/Performed by: Problem Child
Written by Shertz ' Problem Child ' James
Produced by Lashley Motto Winter - Teamfoxx
Mix and mastered by Scratch Master
Artwork by Ink.Designs
Genre: Soca 
 
Please be advised that the music is presented here for your listening pleasure and for promotional purposes only ("Fair Use" Musical Content Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976). No copyright infringement is intended! We don't own the rights to this music: and, it is presented here for promotional use only. We encourage you to promote the artists and their music; please don't download and share the music and rob the artists of needed income! Music for sale should be purchased while music distributed for promotion purposes should be treated as such and not shared!
♫Please press the music player button below to listen now (small triangle in the Music player/TV Frame).

West Indian carnivals are renowned for their vibrant celebrations, pulsating rhythms, and exuberant dance displays. Among the many dance forms showcased at these festivals, some performances have been labeled as "promiscuous" due to their energetic and sensual nature. 

 
These dances have a cultural aspect. Dance expressions are amalgamations of African, European and indigenous influences all due to colonization, slavery and migration across continents and islands. Most of the attention is on women and their ability to "wuk up" (Barbados) or "wine" the term used in Trinidad & Tobago. Promiscuous dancing at West Indian carnivals serves as a means of liberation and self-expression, particularly for women. Historically speaking, women's bodies have been policed and controlled, often subjected to societal restrictions on movement and expression. However, West Indian carnivals challenge these norms by providing a space for women to reclaim their bodies, autonomy, and sexual agency. Promiscuous dancing empowers women to assert their desires and challenge society's expectations, celebrating their bodies and embracing their sexuality on their own terms. By breaking free from societal constraints, women find liberation and an avenue to express their true selves through uninhibited dance forms.
 
Definitely fire... what we see at Carnivals throughout the Caribbean basin, which most likely occurs during fetes rather than carnivals. If you want to know what Carnival euphoria is about, then you need to take a look at what this couple used to showcase carnival ecstasy. I know what you are thinking, "Damn Girl... What Would Your Mama Say?" Is that it? No, not for the guys watching. They wish they could have that guys experience and the ladies would be like, "I could do better than that!" 
 
Here is our advice for the guys, all wines are not the same, make sure you understand that this is just a wine after which you walk away, if it isn't and you get that look then you hit the jackpot 'son'! Seriously now, there will be those watching and wishing they could do that or better. It is important to note, however, that some condescending views send them straight to hell! My advice is that we should all do what makes us happy because tomorrow cannot be guaranteed. Live your life to the fullest and if it means making some prude unhappy, so be it!
 
Finally, don't condemn something you don't understand. Keep in mind the historical context and understand that promiscuous dancing at West Indian carnivals represents a vibrant celebration of culture, liberation, and identity. We hope this helps but we are confident that you will forget all that you read here after watching the video posted with this video.
 
Please visit our official blog at www.sokah2soca.com for more interesting articles. 
 
Let us promote the culture of the Caribbean diaspora:
Our goal is to promote Caribbean culture, artists and music producers. Become the proverbial culture vulture and share this post with your peers and on all social media platforms. We are on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagram and Soundcloud. All our posts are available on FeedSpot, and via Email Subscription. Thank you in advance.
 
Production Notes/Music Credits:
Video Clip: Facebook
 
Please be advised that the music is presented here for your listening pleasure and for promotional purposes only ("Fair Use" Musical Content Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976). No copyright infringement is intended! We don't own the rights to this music: and, it is presented here for promotional use only. We encourage you to promote the artists and their music; please don't download and share the music and rob the artists of needed income! Music for sale should be purchased while music distributed for promotion purposes should be treated as such and not shared!
♫Please press the music player button below to listen now (small triangle in the Music player/TV Frame).
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